A 14 year-old boy was recently raped at knife-point by a 20 year-old woman. When the story broke, it was primarily men who claimed he should have enjoyed it. It was feminists who validated his pain and spoke in support of him.

This is why we need feminism.

(via charlesneedsfeminism)

"but men get raped too-"

AND LOOK HOW YOU HANDLED THAT

(via booooost)

(via galacticavapors)


the-goddamazon:

We know why.

the-goddamazon:

We know why.

(via galacticavapors)


Can someone explain to me

vivalaevolucion:

How Trayvon Martin can be killed for walking back to his crib for wearing a hoodie, but 200-300 white kids can break into a black Ex- NFL players vacation home and cause $20,000+, and none of them get arrested? On the contrary, the parents of said kids threaten to sue him for posting the pictures that their kids posted on twitter and IG? That is the America we live in. Marinate on that.

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)


No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible

the-goddamazon:

kiss-me-on-myneck:

yasboogie:


White Syracuse school guard’s ‘joke’ gets black student to assume the position, mom says
Twelve-year-old Brandon Pearson, who has Down syndrome, was excited to start the school year Tuesday, his first day at a new school.
But he and his family were welcomed to the building with a racist joke from a Syracuse school employee, his mother said.
The incident led school officials to suspend the employee while they investigate her complaint.
Brandon was accompanied on his first day at Huntington K-8 School in Eastwood by his mother, Brandiss Pearson, her husband and her father.
When they stopped in front of a hallway mural to snap pictures, a school sentry, or security guard, who is white, inserted himself. Brandon and his family are black.
"Wait, wait, wait, hold on,” Brandiss Pearson recalls the sentry saying. Then the sentry turned Brandon to face the wall and lifted Brandon’s hands above his head on the wall, as if to be frisked, she said.
"And he starts laughing and says, ‘Now take the picture, he’s in the right position,’ ” Pearson recalled.
The insinuation went over Brandon’s head. He kept smiling. But his family members were stunned, Pearson said. They hurried Brandon off to his classroom to meet his teacher and say their goodbyes. Only after she got home did Pearson stop to process what had happened.
"I was shaking, just like fire-breathing mad,” she said. ”All he saw was a little black boy who needed to assume the position.”
Pearson is a registered nurse at St. Joseph’s Hospital Heath Center. She is studying for a master’s degree at Upstate University. She’s on the board of directors for Home HeadQuarters.
"Nothing that I’ve accomplished can change what some people see,” she said.
Pearson’s father snapped a picture of Brandon in the offensive position, but later deleted it from his phone because it made him angry. “He said he did not want to relive that moment one more second,” Pearson said.
Pearson reported the incident to Huntington’s principal Tuesday afternoon. She tearfully confronted the security guard, or school sentry, Wednesday when she saw him in the hallway. He responded that he thought it was “a funny joke,” she said.
School administrators put the sentry on leave Wednesday while they look into the incident, said Michael Henesey, coordinator of communications for the school district. Henesey declined to identify the sentry. Pearson said she did not know the sentry’s full name.
"We are in receipt of the complaint filed against one of our school sentries,” Henesey said in a prepared statement. "The school district has begun an internal investigation into the alleged complaint. The school sentry in question has been placed on administrative leave while the district conducts the investigation. We will not be releasing any more information at this time." [h/t]

Update: Syracuse district fires white school guard for ‘joke’ having black child assume the position

wow

AND THEN THEY WONDER WHY BLACK KIDS GET THEIR CONFIDENCE DESTROYED IN SCHOOL.
They already treating them like criminals before they even START.

the-goddamazon:

kiss-me-on-myneck:

yasboogie:

White Syracuse school guard’s ‘joke’ gets black student to assume the position, mom says

Twelve-year-old Brandon Pearson, who has Down syndrome, was excited to start the school year Tuesday, his first day at a new school.

But he and his family were welcomed to the building with a racist joke from a Syracuse school employee, his mother said.

The incident led school officials to suspend the employee while they investigate her complaint.

Brandon was accompanied on his first day at Huntington K-8 School in Eastwood by his mother, Brandiss Pearson, her husband and her father.

When they stopped in front of a hallway mural to snap pictures, a school sentry, or security guard, who is white, inserted himself. Brandon and his family are black.

"Wait, wait, wait, hold on,” Brandiss Pearson recalls the sentry saying. Then the sentry turned Brandon to face the wall and lifted Brandon’s hands above his head on the wall, as if to be frisked, she said.

"And he starts laughing and says, ‘Now take the picture, he’s in the right position,’ ” Pearson recalled.

The insinuation went over Brandon’s head. He kept smiling. But his family members were stunned, Pearson said. They hurried Brandon off to his classroom to meet his teacher and say their goodbyes. Only after she got home did Pearson stop to process what had happened.

"I was shaking, just like fire-breathing mad,” she said. ”All he saw was a little black boy who needed to assume the position.”

Pearson is a registered nurse at St. Joseph’s Hospital Heath Center. She is studying for a master’s degree at Upstate University. She’s on the board of directors for Home HeadQuarters.

"Nothing that I’ve accomplished can change what some people see,” she said.

Pearson’s father snapped a picture of Brandon in the offensive position, but later deleted it from his phone because it made him angry. “He said he did not want to relive that moment one more second,” Pearson said.

Pearson reported the incident to Huntington’s principal Tuesday afternoon. She tearfully confronted the security guard, or school sentry, Wednesday when she saw him in the hallway. He responded that he thought it was “a funny joke,” she said.

School administrators put the sentry on leave Wednesday while they look into the incident, said Michael Henesey, coordinator of communications for the school district. Henesey declined to identify the sentry. Pearson said she did not know the sentry’s full name.

"We are in receipt of the complaint filed against one of our school sentries,” Henesey said in a prepared statement. "The school district has begun an internal investigation into the alleged complaint. The school sentry in question has been placed on administrative leave while the district conducts the investigation. We will not be releasing any more information at this time." [h/t]

Update: Syracuse district fires white school guard for ‘joke’ having black child assume the position

wow

AND THEN THEY WONDER WHY BLACK KIDS GET THEIR CONFIDENCE DESTROYED IN SCHOOL.

They already treating them like criminals before they even START.

(via bergdorfcocotte)


medschoolsb:

ratedmirr:

missjia:

via Marissa Sargeant on Facebook:
This is my 14 yr old son who was brutually tortured By 2 Tully town officers he was handcuff but they say he resisted arrest that yall tazzed him in his face …not only that they took him to lower bucks hospital with out his mother consent they broke his nose n both eyes were swollen shut these prejudice cops need a rude awakening any one know anyone that can help my son please help they took him to the police station n told me I could not come up there but as a mother who loves her child I did Go to the station they would not let me n at all they talked to me through the door I didn’t see my son for tree days n the cops says o he’s fine we ordered him pizza really? Any one who can help me get justice please comment I’m torn mad angry just can’t deal # HELP

everybody reblog this!! we gotta this on the news or something!! If you know someone or you think you know someone who cant help, please try to get the word out!! Police Brutality must be Stopped


Please Reblog!

medschoolsb:

ratedmirr:

missjia:

via Marissa Sargeant on Facebook:

This is my 14 yr old son who was brutually tortured By 2 Tully town officers he was handcuff but they say he resisted arrest that yall tazzed him in his face …not only that they took him to lower bucks hospital with out his mother consent they broke his nose n both eyes were swollen shut these prejudice cops need a rude awakening any one know anyone that can help my son please help they took him to the police station n told me I could not come up there but as a mother who loves her child I did Go to the station they would not let me n at all they talked to me through the door I didn’t see my son for tree days n the cops says o he’s fine we ordered him pizza really? Any one who can help me get justice please comment I’m torn mad angry just can’t deal # HELP

everybody reblog this!! we gotta this on the news or something!! If you know someone or you think you know someone who cant help, please try to get the word out!! Police Brutality must be Stopped

Please Reblog!

(via bergdorfcocotte)


worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

(via lolita-escort)


america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 
Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.
Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.
But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?
Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.
While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.
We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.
This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 

Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.

Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.

But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?

Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.

While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.

We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.

This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 

(Read Full Text)

(via bergdorfcocotte)


mysharona1987:

Tell me white privilege isn’t real.

(via bergdorfcocotte)


sp0iledbabe:

gang0fwolves:

i be listenin to Freek-A-Leek and gettin into it

up until the part where he say

”..and love to get get her pussy licked by another bitch, cause I ain’t drunk enough to do that shit “

image

you talkin bout how freaky and nasty you are for 4 minutes straight and you can’t even eat pussy?

hell nah

TRUE

(via lolita-escort)